Storing Your Lawnmower This Winter

by:Jiali     2020-07-18
One nice thing about summer coming to a close? No more mowing the lawn! While it's nice to be able to throw the old mower in the garage for the fall and winter seasons, if you don't properly winterize your mower you may end up with some hefty (and unexpected) repair fees come spring.
NOTE: Exceptions to this discussion are cord or cordless mowers. For these models, simply keep them clean and the batteries (for cordless) serviced appropriately.
For all you gas lawnmower users out there: use today's post as a guide to winterizing your lawnmower at the end of every summer - and save yourselves some hard-earned cash in the process!
1. Empty the gas tank. Most experts agree that this is the best method. Fire up the mower, and let it sit outside (not in the garage or shed) and run until it's out of gas. If this isn't practical for you, then buy some fuel stabilizer to add to the gas in the tank.
2. Clean your mower. Knock off all the old, hard grass clumps and debris underneath your mower's top housing. Finish the cleaning job with an aggressive hose bath.
3. Clean or replace the air filter. You may have done this once or twice during the summer, but now is the perfect time to clean or replace it once more so it's ready for next spring.
4. Change the oil. This one is very important and will save you good money on repair (or outright mower replacement). Once you've properly disposed of the used oil, fill the mower with fresh oil and use the dipstick to make sure the mower is filled to exactly the right levels.
5. Check (and change if necessary) your spark plugs. Corroded, rotten spark plugs should be replaced before you put your mower away for the winter.
6. Have the blade sharpened. You should get this done once a year, at the close of summer. You will be happy you did when you fire the mower up this spring and cut through the tall grass like a razor blade through butter.
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